Sex & Your Emotions

emotions at carnival resizedYour emotions play a huge part in directing your actions. That’s why sex, which powerfully affects your emotions, can take control of your life—even when you know you ought to do things differently.

Scientists have discovered that when you engage in sex your body releases some pretty strong brain-altering chemicals (hormones and neurotransmitters).1  These chemicals create feelings of bondedness and trust in your partner. What a boost for a long-term relationship!2

But what if you have sex with someone you hardly know? Before you can even find out if he’s a good person for you, those chemicals are teaching your emotions to trust and bond with him. Sounds like a recipe for a broken heart.

No wonder, then, that choosing to treat sex lightly releases an avalanche of painful feelings: guilt, shame, betrayal, abandonment, fear, jealousy, emptiness . . . Sex had made you feel you’d found true love—when all you’d really found was sex.

You can do better than that. Stay in control of your feelings. Regardless of your past choices, decide today to reserve sex for that one person with whom you are committed to a love that lasts “until death do us part.” When you do, you will find yourself thinking more clearly and feeling better about your life. You’ll have time to build friendships with people who appreciate you as a whole person. Your self-confidence will soar. So join the majority (yes, it’s a majority!3) of young people today who are saying NO to the disappointments of “casual” sex and YES to the joy of truly satisfying relationships.

Would you like to take control of the emotions that come with the sexual side of relationships? We can help you with that. Drop by Choices today–or text us first to find out more. Your heart will thank you.

 

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  1. “Neurobiology of Love” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15990719
  2. “Oxytocin: The Monogamy Hormone?” http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269365.php
  3. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System 2013 report, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6304.pdf